A taser gun is a handheld device that when pressed against a person and activated sends a strong electrical charge into said person. It usually has a calming effect on someone who is acting particularly unruly or who is being unusually combative.

Every once in a while, however, things go wrong and the person being tasered ends up dead. In my opinion, that is powerful information. For if I am being particularly unruly or unusually combative and someone pulls out a taser gun in order to subdue me, I might realize that if that thing touches me, it is not only going to hurt real bad, but it could kill me. That thought alone might have a calming effect on my personality.

I recently read that as many as 150 people are said to have died after being tasered. This information comes from the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, which is protesting the use of taser guns, and in fact had a recent two-mile march to call for law enforcement to stop using them.

According to the information I read, the manufacturers of taser guns say that 170,000 are in use in 8,000 law enforcement agencies in 43 countries around the world. I'll let you draw your own conclusions concerning those numbers verses the number of deaths.

The protest by the SCLC is a result of a Lawrenceville man's death after he was tasered. Fredrick Williams died last year after Gwinnett County deputies hit him with a stun gun while he was in jail. The group has asked that district attorney Danny Porter reopen the investigation into Williams' death. They want a special grand jury convened to determine whether or not the deputies should be held accountable. Porter has said no, pointing out that an investigation of the incident has already been completed.

Good for him. I'm all for civil rights. But I support civil rights after I support the rights of citizens who obey the law and the rights of the law enforcement officers to protect themselves and others around them, using any means necessary.

It is always sad when someone dies, especially when the death is preventable. I don't know the details of Williams' death, but I have to believe that the deceased in this case shares some of the responsibility. What was he doing in jail to begin with? What was he doing, or not doing, which led to the use of the stun gun?

From what I understand, the stun gun was originally introduced as a way to subdue people without doing permanent damage, as opposed to damage inflicted by bullets or batons. Obviously, with 150 supposed deaths, the use of the taser is not an exact science, but it is still a better deterrent in close combat than a firearm.

Taking the taser away from the law enforcement officer will only serve to weaken the officer, and in doing so makes the criminal element stronger. If you don't like the idea of the taser, don't do anything that will make it come out of the holster.

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