WASHINGTON — National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) forecasters are calling for a busier hurricane season than initially forecast, according to a press release.

Forecasters with NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center have revised their initial forecast from May, increasing the chance of an above-normal Atlantic hurricane season from 30% to 45%.

Hurricane season runs through Nov. 30. Its peak months are August through October.

Forecasters are now expecting 10-17 named storms, with 5-9 forecast to become hurricanes and 2-4 to become major hurricanes (a major hurricane is one with winds in excess of 111 miles per hour).

On average, the Atlantic hurricane season produces 12 named storms, of which six become hurricanes, including three major hurricanes.

“El Nino typically suppresses Atlantic hurricane activity but now that it’s gone, we could see a busier season ahead,” said Gerry Bell, Ph.D., lead seasonal hurricane forecaster at NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center. “This evolution, combined with the more conducive conditions associated with the ongoing high-activity era for Atlantic hurricanes that began in 1995, increases the likelihood of above-normal activity this year.”

“Today’s updated outlook is a reminder to be prepared,” said Pete Gaynor, acting Federal Emergency Management Agency administrator. “We urge everyone to learn more about hurricane hazards and prepare now, ahead of time, so that if state and local authorities announce evacuations in advance of a storm, you and your family will have planned where to go and what to do to stay safe.”

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