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February 28, 2014

StoryCorps coming to Tifton this month

TIFTON —

StoryCorps is one of the largest oral history projects of its kind – and it's coming to Tifton.

StoryCorps has collected and archived more than 50,000 interviews from more than 80,000 participants, and is recorded on a free CD, and is preserved at the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress. The program produces segments that are broadcast on National Public Radio and on NPR's website. The program is a nonprofit, and relies on government, foundation and corporate support, as well as individual donations. 

Now in its 10th year, StoryCorps continues to travel the country, and will be coming to Tifton as part of The Threads That Bind exhibit. The program will have equipment and people in place beginning March 9, and will be available by appointment through the end of the exhibit March 21. 

Marion Curry and Syd Blackmarr, the guiding lights behind The Threads that Bind, say the addition of StoryCorps to the exhibit enhances the power of story.

"StoryCorps gives local people the unique opportunity to share the wisdom that each person's life experience brings. It is a very personal expansion of the experience of the 'thread' that binds," she said.

"This is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to record for posterity an important story about a significant relationship with a parent, grandparent or spouse, or to share a transformative event in your life," Blackmarr added.

Amanda Plumb, StoryCorps regional manager, says that in the more than four years the organization has been in Georgia, they have recorded more than 3,000 interviews with more than 6,000 people, and 200 stories have aired on a weekly broadcast on WABE 90.1. You can hear these stories at www.wabe.org/storycorps.

"The purpose of StoryCorps is to give people of all backgrounds and beliefs the opportunity to record, share and preserve the stories of their lives. We do this because we believe that every life matters and everyone has a story to tell," Plumb said. "We hear from people all the time who tell us that interviewing a loved one has brought them closer together. And they learned something new that they never knew about their spouse, parent, child, friend, sibling, etc."

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